Monday, July 7, 2014

Dexcon/OSWARP

Just wanted to put out a quick "thank you" to everyone who bought Adventures Dark and Deep and Castle of the Mad Archmage at this weekend's Dexcon/OSWARP convention. Everyone should have gotten their download codes for the pdf versions of the books by now - if you haven't, check your spam filter. They do tend to get flagged as spam for some reason.

Monday, June 23, 2014

Thanks!

I just wanted to extend a big "thank you" to everyone who participated in this past weekend's Midsummer Madness Sale. Thanks to you, we got a big shot in the arm which will set us up to do some pretty amazing things later this year and in 2015.

Unfortunately, I can't say what those amazing things are quite yet, but believe me... they're going to be amazing!

Friday, June 20, 2014

Midsummer Madness Sale Happening Now - 30% off Everything!

It's here!

From June 20-22, BRW Games is having a sale, with 30% off all of our titles. That's pdf and hardcopy. Rulebooks and adventures. Supplements and novels. Everything.

If you've been holding off getting Castle of the Mad Archmage, now's your chance. You can get it for under $14 in pdf, and under $25 in hard copy. See the 13+ level megadungeon in all its glory!

If you've been curious about Adventures Dark and Deep, now's the time to strike. You can get it for under $25 in pdf, and under $50 in hard copy. The answer to "What might the game have looked like if Gary Gygax been allowed to keep developing it?" can be yours.

But the madness will end soon. Sunday evening. So get them while you can - no telling if We'll ever do a sale again. It's an experiment.

Click here for the sale!

Friday, June 13, 2014

Swords of the Damned 2nd Printing Now Available

A few months ago, BRW Games published the first novel based on Adventures Dark and Deep, called Swords of the Damned, by Richard Tongue. Unfortunately, as some readers pointed out, it was somewhat lacking in proof-reading, and contained numerous errors.

I'm pleased to say that a second printing is now available, which hopefully rectifies this situation. It's been gone-through by our own Mollie Carson-Vollath, she who edited the ADD rulebooks, and I think you'll find that the new edition is of a much higher quality.

For the next few days, the new edition will be available for only $6.95, which is more than 20% off the regular price.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Midsummer Madness is Coming, June 20-22

We don't do sales. We've never done sales. But now, We're about to do a sale.

Midsummer Madness is upon us!

In conjunction with both Free RPG Day and the Summer Solstice, all BRW Games products will be available for 30% off from Friday June 20 through Sunday June 22.

What does this mean?

It means you can get all three Castle of the Mad Archmage books for less than 14 bucks in pdf. Under $25 in hard copy (under $32 if you go hardcover). And that goes for the old-school version as well as the new Pathfinder edition.

It means you can get all three of the core rulebooks for Adventures Dark and Deep for less than 25 bucks in pdf. Under $50 in hard copy (under $70 if you want to go hardcover). And if you need some spare Players Manuals for your table, this is the perfect time to stock up on 'em.

But its only for the three days around the Summer Solstice. Once the Stars are No Longer Right, you're back to paying bust-out retail for another year at least. No idea if I'll do this next year.

Personally, I think it's a pretty good deal. Spread the word, tell your friends! If you've been wondering what folks are talking about, now's the time to find out.

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Q&A: Verbal Patter

A player was going through the Adventures Dark and Deep Players Manual and asked the following:
Regarding the Jester's and Bard's verbal patter skills, how do you reconcile them with the fact that all players should be able to try to befuddle a group or try to have them distrust someone through pure dialog with the DM? 
My answer: I generally play it by ear (heh).

Ahem. Seriously, I tend to encourage the players to try their verbal patter on me (as GM) and then roll. If their actual attempts were lame, but they made the roll, then they succeeded anyway. If they were genuinely good at the table, I might give them a bonus to the roll, so if it was a mediocre roll, they might still succeed.

Alternatively,  it would be the case that if someone who did not have verbal patter as a class skill did a lousy job of trying to actual befuddle me at the table, they'd fail. If they did a great job, they'd probably succeed. They just wouldn't have the chance to succeed on a die roll even when they do a bad job at the table.

Hope that helps!

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Game Industry News

Two very interesting bits of industry news, for those who are inclined to follow such things (like game publishers... ahem).

The first is from TechCrunch, and focuses on Kickstarter founder Yancey Strickler. Of particular interest in the gaming realm is this:
Strickler pointed to board games as one of the community-driven enthusiast areas that the platform has been able to support — noting that as of this week Kickstarter will pass $100 million having been cumulatively pledged to board games.
“Last year there was actually more money pledged to board games than video games,” added Strickler. “It’s like $55 million in board games. It’s kind of counterintuitive to the way that we think the world is moving but I think the board game market on Kickstarter is very illustrative of what it is that we actually do.
“I remember meeting someone is 2009 or 2010 — really early for us — who said that Kickstarter was the first thing to change the board game industry since the early 70s. Basically it’s this huge fan community… They weren’t in a scale to where the Parker Brothers or Milton Bradley would drop a huge chunk of change on it. So we ended up stepping in and being this perfect conduit for these communities to exist.”
There's more at the link, of course, including a reiteration of Kickstarter's intention not to get into the company-equity business. That decision probably has a lot to do with the legal implications; there are all sorts of Federal regulations around such activity, and Kickstarter probably feels it's just too much trouble and risk.

The second is from the New York Times, which has a very nice article on board games in relation to video games:
New tools now power the creation of tabletop games -- many in the strategy or fantasy genres -- from idea to delivery. Crowdfunding sites provide the seed money and offer an early gauge of demand. Machines like 3-D printers can rapidly create figurines, dice and other prototype game pieces. And Amazon, the online retail giant, can handle shipping and distribution, cutting out the need for middlemen.
Sales have followed. While the video game business long ago eclipsed its low-tech cousin, sales of tabletop games have continued to grow. ... Amazon says board game sales increased by a double-digit percentage from 2012 to 2013.
All in all, it's a great time to be a gamer. And a game publisher.

(h/t to Global Toy News)